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What's in you Garden?



Mark Hoddle
      Mark Hoddle
  Personal Website 

 

 

 

"What's in you garden?" Presented by Mark Hoddle
Original date, April 28, 2011

Mark Hoddle, the Director of the Invasive Species Research, takes a look at three invasive species invading Southern California and their impact on the region. Mark also details the current research to combat these pests in the lab and field. The first invasive is Asian Citrus Psyllid which threatens California’s historic citrus heritage. Asian Citrus Psyllid transports a disease that can kill citrus trees. With no cure for this disease, it threatens to destroy California's billion dollar citrus industry. The second invasive is Red Palm Weevil. It is considered to be the most dangerous threat to California’s iconic palm trees. Red Palm Weevil was discovered for the first time in August of 2010, but has quickly become a primary concern for the CDFA, UCR entomologist.s, date and palm tree growers, and home owners in Laguna Beach The third invasive is the Goldspotted Oak Borer. Hundreds of beetles can attack a single oak tree, and feeding beetle larvae eventually kill oaks, many of which are over 100 years old. Dead and dying trees increase the fuel load for devastating forest fires and valuable oak habitat for native forest animals is degraded as are popular hiking and camping areas in the Cleveland National Forest in San Diego County.

Excerpt on the Goldspotted Oak Borer

[6 mins] Mark Hoddle, the Director of the Invasive Species Research, takes a look at the Goldspotted Oak Borer and its impact on California. YouTube link

Excerpt on the Glassy-winged Sharpshooter

[6 mins] Mark Hoddle, the Director of the Invasive Species Research, takes a look at the Glassy-winged Sharpshooter and its impact on California. YouTube link

Excerpt on the Asian Citrus Psyllid

[9 mins] Mark Hoddle, the Director of the Invasive Species Research, takes a look at the Asian Citrus Psyllid and its impact on California. YouTube link

Excerpt on the Red Palm Weevil

[10 mins] Mark Hoddle, the Director of the Invasive Species Research, takes a look at the Red Palm Weevil and its impact on California. YouTube link

More information on these pests from CISR

Asian Citrus Psyllid Asian Citrus Psyllid

Asian citrus psyllid is an efficient vector of the citrus disease huanglongbing (HLB), previously called citrus greening disease, which is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus worldwide. In North America, the psyllid vector...

 

Red Palm Weevil Red Palm Weevil

Red Palm Weevil is widely considered to be the most damaging insect pest of palms in the world. The primary hosts of the Red Palm Weevil include 24 species of palms in 14 genera, including most of the common landscape palms found in California....

 

Goldspotted Oak Borer Goldspotted Oak Borer

The goldspotted oak borer (GSOB) was first detected in 2004 in San Diego Co., California by the California Department of Food and Agriculture during a survey for exotic woodborers...

 

 


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CISR Information

Center for Invasive Species Research
Chapman Hall, Room 108A

Mark Hoddle
Director of the Center for Invasive Species Research
Tel: (951) 827-4714
E-mail: cisr@ucr.edu

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